Sunday, October 04, 2015

Blame Robert Crais (for why the WIR is late)

Normally I tackle the week in review on Saturday morning.
It's one of my favorite things to do, so not much can divert me from it.

This week, one thing did.

I got an ARC of THE PROMISE by Robert Crais.



Now, I've known Bob Crais for a long time, and I am a DEVOTED fan of Elvis Cole and Joe Pike. I've read all of the early Elvis Cole novels more than once.

In recent years though, I've been a bit of a slacker fan. I'd discovered other writers that I needed to know to stay current, and I don't have as much reading time as I wish I did for authors I love as a fan.

But, when Jon Jordan extolled the THE PROMISE on Twitter, I tweeted back with a sad face that I didn't have a copy of the book. And Jon, being a VERY nice friend, sent me his ARC when he was done.

And that, dear reader, is why the Week in Review is going to be late.

THE PROMISE is like reconnecting with a beloved old friend. Like going home for Christmas after years away. Like rediscovering a favorite restaurant that has only gotten better in the years you've been off sampling fusion cuisine.

I may have been a slacker fan in years gone by, but never again. Robert Crais is the cat's pajamas. Elvis' cat's pajamas in fact.

Have you rediscovered an old favorite after a time away?


40 comments:

Lance said...

It's always worth the wait. Thank you for something else to add to the TBR pile.

E.M. Goldsmith said...

Lawrence Block will do that any time he writes a new Bernie Rhodenbarr book. Brandon Sanderson did that this week with his latest Mistborn book. I always have a pile next to my bed, old favorites and new flavors to try. By the way, I adored Station Eleven. Thanks for introducing me to it. And WIR is totally worth the wait.

RobCeres said...

If only Jane Austen had written four more novels. Sigh.

I just read Paper Towns after only having read The Fault in our Stars. Wow. Now I can't wait to read John Green 's next one.

Every now and again I get a real yearning for an Agatha Christy novel.

Amanda Capper said...

OMG. I think I'm actually squeeing. Not sure, but I am amazed at Robert Crais surfacing.

Two days ago I checked out "The First Rule" and "The Sentry" from my local library. Hadn't read him in a while and these were two that I missed along the way, but I wondered while I was reading if Mr. Crais was still alive. HE IS! Good news.

When will this one be available? And I still haven't found Mary Higgins Clark latest, at least not in the bookstores. What was the name of that one again?

Craig said...

Dashiell Hammett.

Finally found the copy of his big five I had misplaced.

James Ticknor said...

No, but I will say if you love a book as a kid, it's probably ill adivce to go back and re-read it...in my sad case, "The Stones of Mourning Creek" by Diane Les Becquets. Loved it as a kid, couldn't stand it as an adult. Strange how the mind changes, no?

Dena Pawling said...


My favorite book as a kid was Incident at Hawk's Hill, about a boy who got lost and lived for a time with a badger. I've always wanted to read it again. Maybe I won't, tho, because I don't want to spoil my memory of it. I know people who absolutely loved To Kill a Mockingbird and deeply regret reading Go Set a Watchman because it ruined their fond memories.

Take your time on WiR. We'll wait =)


BJ Muntain said...

I keep a pile of Terry Pratchett books near my bed. I've read them all several times, and each time I buy a new one, I go back and read some older ones, too. Even after buying his last, I'm sure I will continue going back. His work never loses its charm.

When I was a teenager, I started reading Leslie Charteris's Saint books. Yes, The Saint, as in TV and movie fame. The more recent books were written by others, but I find when I go back to read *his* books, I always enjoy them. They may seem a little old-fashioned (the first books were written in the 1920s, after all), but I always enjoy them. Maybe it's time to dig out those books again...

Donnaeve said...

When I was in my early twenties, I was introduced to The King. No not Elvis and his cat's pajamas, the OTHER King.

I blogged about my collection of his books a while back, and had the picture to prove I was a big fan back in the day. I guess you could say I was trying to re-discover him after a long hiatus (more than a decade?)when I tried him again. I read DUMA KEY (2008). I liked it, I didn't LOVE it. I remembered how my heart would race while reading some of his older stuff (CARRIE, CUJO, MISERY, DELORES CLAIBORNE)

There could be a story of his I haven't read that might do that. Maybe one of the more recent works like 11/22/63, JOYLAND or DOCTOR SLEEP. IDK.


Kitty said...

I re-read Steve Hamilton's Alex McKnight books and loved them more the 2nd time around. Same with the Stephanie Plum series by Evanovich.

Peggy Rothschild said...

Best excuse EVER! I'm a devoted fan of Crais -- he's one of the few authors I'll pre-order!

Megan V said...

Laura Lippman and Carl Hiassen

Loved them both while a kid. Revisited them a few weeks ago. Still a fan.

In a way, I guess rediscovering a book (or author) is like a torrid love affair. You married to one book and you love and revisit it often, but then you find a mistress who steals all of your attention and affection. Soon you're moving from mistress to mistress until...there you see the book you married. And you rediscover why you fell in love in the first place!

Angie Brooksby-Arcangioli said...

I love Robert Crais. It's good to know he gets better, like your restaurant.

I'm rediscovering Dr. Seuss to help the kids I teach learn how to read English correctly.

Marc P said...

Robert Crais is Ace.

Please send it to me when you have finished it Janet.. and I will swop you for something ;)

S.D.King said...

Every so often I pick Wodehouse off my shelf and I never fail to smile.

John Frain said...

EM, Thanks for the reminder about Lawrence Block and Bernie Rhodenbarr. What a character. Love him. That would be a fond re-introduction if I found a new one I haven't read, and I'm sure there are probably a few.

Do most people have the same problem as me, you're never sure based on a title if you've already read something and it takes several pages to determine. Happens to me often. Too often probably.

I've read only one Robert Crais, last year. Loved it and will read more. Can't remember the title, but it's on a shelf around here somewhere. I'll add this to my list and maybe I'll be ready by the time it comes out.

Lisa Bodenheim said...

I enjoy going back to reread Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart, getting caught up in their worlds as much as I was when I was a teen. And Patricia McKillip's "The Forgotten Beasts of Eld."

It's a perfect day here (crispy cool and cloudy) to get caught up in another world, an author created world.

Amy Schaefer said...

Jealous, jealous, jealous. I've been waiting for the new Crais book; this one got delayed a couple of times. But if the ARC is out, then it is only a matter of time until the rest of us can enjoy it, too.

Most of my paper books are in storage; I haven't seen them in five years. I'm looking forward to rediscovering my old favourites when we move home.

Colin Smith said...

There are so many novels I'm getting to for the first time, I don't have time to do much re-reading! Seriously, if I named some of the authors I recently read for the first time, Janet would find a new depth of Carkoon to send me to, and probably revoke any and all Bouchercon privileges. :-\

I suppose one re-read I could name is GRIMBLE AND GRIMBLE AT CHRISTMAS by Clement Freud. I loved that book as a child. About five years ago, my Mum found a copy in a used book store and sent it to me. It still makes me laugh. Great storytelling. :)

Colin Smith said...

Oh, and of all the reasons to postpone the WiR, you had to choose the best one. ;)

Donnaeve said...

Sooo, b/c everyone out here is talking about the love for RC, I skedaddled on over to his "official" site...and realize the "Elvis" isn't referencing ELVIS, The King, but Elvis Cole - a character. Which goes to show I have never read RC. Which also means I'm not a big fan of crime novels.

*cringes*

MVB said...

This season, in my bookclub, members are taking it in turns to propose a book they love for the month's reading. Of course, you also want to pick one you think the others will actually like. It's very difficult.

In an effort to make a good choice, I've been doing some re-reading. Anyone remember Tom Robbins, a big name in the 90s?

I read Jitterbug Perfume back in the day and loved it. It was original and different, a strong contender for book-club. Until I re-read it. Looking at it now, I'm utterly baffled as to what won me over so completely 20 years ago.

On the other hand, I also re-read Cormac Mc Carthy's All the Pretty Horses and 20+ years later, that one still stood the test of time.


Janice L. Grinyer said...

Gerald Durrell - "My family and other animals" - still giggle myself to sleep every couple of years while reading this in bed :D

Jessica Snell said...

It's always a joy to go back to an old, loved author.

I rediscovered Robin McKinley's early stuff by reading "The Blue Sword". Great stuff.

And even better is rediscovering old loves by reading them to my kids. Just reread John White's Anthropos series to the little ones. Not perfect, but so fun and good. Lovely to see them get excieted about it.

And occasionally I go on a binge: all the Howatch, all the Sayers, all the Ellis Peters, all the Bujold, all the Lewis, all the Whalen Turner.

It's always fun.

Madeline Mora-Summonte said...

Donna - those early Stephen King books are some of my all time favorites. I re-read THE STAND now and then, and love it every time. He's got a collection of stories - most previously published, I believe - coming out in November.

For Janet and all you Lee Child/Jack Reacher and/or Stephen King fans, there's a video linked over on King's website (StephenKing.com - sorry, I don't know how to do the hyperlink here!) where he interviews Child - they talk about writing, take questions from the audience etc. Good stuff! :)

Colin Smith said...

Madeline: Here you go: StephenKing.com and the video is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PaxX-DTGo0&feature=youtu.be

Donnaeve said...

Madeline - what do you know! THE STAND was my very first King book. Speaking of falling back in love, maybe that's one I ought to re-visit. How I used to love the heft of his books in my hand, knowing I was only starting and that I had HUNDREDS of pages to go. I devoured them, while trying to savor them at the same time.

AJ Blythe said...

Nope, haven't discovered a fave after time away ... because I don't let favourites go! My will only part with these books over my dead body bookshelves are full. From childhood books (eg LM Montgomery, Agatha Christie, Dick Francis) to current (eg Jenn McKinlay, Felix Francis, Jana deLeon) I re-read over and over again. The Hub is resigned to the fact our house has boxes, piles, shelves full of books I can't bring myself to part with.

My greatest delight is I am now introducing the eldest of The Barbarians to these books and he is now an avid reader of Terry Pratchett, Agatha Christie, David Eddings. He looks longingly at my other books and can't wait until he's old enough to dive into those.

Madeline Mora-Summonte said...

Colin - thank you! :)

Donna - I know EXACTLY what you mean about the heft of those books, about devouring them yet trying to savor them. I believe I read MISERY and/or DOLORES CLAIBORNE each in one sitting. I know they're not doorstoppers but still. I keep meaning to go back and read those old stories/novellas, like The Body (Stand By Me) and Rita Hayworth and The Shawshank Redemption. (If you've seen my blog, you'll know Shawshank is a particular favorite of mine.) :)

E.M. Goldsmith said...

Donna- love all the King books. I remember reading Salem's Lot as young child. I love the Stand and The Dark Tower series and the way it traverses so many of King's creations. Oh boy, I want to revisit the whole collection. Why are there so few hours in the day?

Calorie Bombshell said...

Go Ask Alice. Re-discovered after thirty years. Powerful stuff then and still powerful now.

Julie.M.Weathers said...

I'm still hip deep in research books. REBEL ROSE is dry as year old snuff, but I continue forcing myself through it because it's very well researched and notes a lot of dates, names, and events with documentation I may need later. I finished two books on women of the old west. Interesting, but mostly stuff I already knew by heart and nothing terribly well written.

Because I need to renew my fiction writer's brain I'm reading Elizabeth Peters, which isn't a good idea. It's luring me into focusing more on the murders in the historical and I don't want to turn this into a historical mystery.

I ordered Patrick Rothfuss' THE SLOW REGARD OF SILENT THINGS and I'm looking forward to reading that. Rothfuss makes me want to throw word count to the wind and write the story in my heart. Until then, I'll just get lost in his world and roll around in it like a pig in new mud.

I'm looking forward to reading Mary Stewart's AIRS ABOVE THE GROUND as well. Ms. Stewart can usually reprime my writing pump with her beautiful writing. Stewart is one of the few writers I can reread and be just as mesmerized the second or third time.

Another author I can always count on is Patrick O'Brien. I wish he'd started writing that darned series sooner. I have his books in my TBR bookcase next to the desk. He's on deck.


CynthiaMc said...

Airs Above the Ground is one of my favorite books of all time. It combines mystery, humor, castles and horses. Who could ask for anything more?

Carolynnwith2Ns said...

King and Koontz. That says it all for me.

Julie.M.Weathers said...

Cynthia,

Precisely. I almost returned to the Merlin series, but I needed something lighter and I knew I'd not be able to put it aside.

Theresa said...

The Stand is one of my all-time favorites, and I've never been disappointed on a re-read. However, the last few King books I've tried to read, I couldn't finish.

I've stopped counting how many times I've read Gone With the Wind.

I was haunted for years by Go Ask Alice, until I read about its publication history, then not so much.

Elizabeth Peters was a wonder. I still miss Amelia Peabody and haven't yet had the heart to re-read any of them.

I've never read Lee Child or Robert Crais. Packing for Carkoon now....

Marc P said...

@Donnaeve I'm still reeling from the not liking crime. That's just mean. And Elvis is not any on detective he's 'The world's greatest detective!' ask Mickey Mouse!

Marc P said...

@Donnaeve I'm still reeling from the not liking crime. That's just mean. And Elvis is not any on detective he's 'The world's greatest detective!' ask Mickey Mouse!

number1texgirl@gmail.com said...

Martha Grimes and Elizabeth George

Panda in Chief said...

So many of my favorite writers have been mentioned: Carl Hiassen, Laura Lippman, Elizabeth George (who modeled a character after my SO, in her young adult series set on Whidbey Island) ... May I add to the list: Jasper Fforde and Barbara Kingsolver?