Yes, this is filled with whisky

Yes, this is filled with whisky

Sunday, August 05, 2012

It's beautiful, but what is it?

Sometime back I posted a picture from the blog "Things Organized Neatly" and asked you to guess what the items were.

Here's another picture. Except they forgot to tell us what the items are!
















Do you know? And if you figured it out (rather than already knowing) what did you do to find out?

30 comments:

Bill Plante said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Maria Zannini said...

They kind of look like bobbins to me, but I'm not sure.

JeffO said...

Well, they looked at first like groovy, custom-made baseball bats, but I'm going to guess they're fancy balusters.

Richard Gibson said...

Pipe cleaners?

elliot said...

I believe they are war clubs from Pacific Islands. But my memory isn't too reliable.

Elisabeth Black said...

Drumsticks. Drop spindles. Really ineffective arrows.

Janet Reid said...

bill, yes, that's where I got it, but what are the objects? I absolutely could not figure it out from the site.

Jane | @janelebak said...

To me they look like bed posts. But then again, I never figured out the other ones either.

Jane Smith said...

They're bobbins for lace-making (is it called tatting?). You use several bobbins wound with a very fine thread, and pin it onto a small cushion; then make repeated knots and twists to build the piece of lace.

JES said...

Most of them look like sample legs from the catalogue of a furniture craftsman -- maybe for dollhouses?

Part of the difficulty is not knowing the scale. If these are at roughly actual size, they may be organized neatly but not particularly usefully, because who the hell has fingers capable of pulling one of those things away from the rest without bringing them all clattering down? Which suggests that the scale is greatly reduced; they're probably big enough, with enough space between them, to enable the user (?) to insert a hand between adjacent items.

The one puzzle is [counting] 10th from the right. Is that a hollow spring at the upper end? or something carved/wrapped around a solid cylinder?

Laura Hughes, MittensMorgul said...

I googled the artist, Vincent Kohler.

http://www.vincentkohler.ch/turnaround.html

It was a project he did with 30 types of wood, creating his image of baseball bats. The link takes you to the website where there are pictures of a baseball player holding a few of them.

Note: I muddled my way through the whole description in French before I realized the paragraph below was in English. Duh!

Michael said...

They look like nostepindes to me. They originated in Norway, and are used to wind balls of yarn that pull from the inside.

Heather Hawke said...

Spindles for Rumpelstiltskin?

Charley said...

They're cricket bats for the criminally insane. If the ball goes anywhere near a reasonable location, you lose.

Bill Plante said...

Turnaround is an artistic project focusing on the theme of the baseball bat.
A collection of thirty baseball bats, turned in different species of woods, each unique in form.
SO THERE!

collectonian said...

Laura beat me to it - it's Vincent Kohler's baseball bat themed art project.

For how I found it, I dragged the image over to Google search and had it find matches to the image itself :)

Sha'el, Princess of Pixies said...

baseball bat sculptures by Vincent Kohler.

http://www.booooooom.com/2011/10/28/baseball-bat-sculptures-by-artist-vincent-kohler/

I found it by using my Pixie sense.

K Catalona said...

Honey dippers

Sha'el, Princess of Pixies said...

okay, okay so I'll tell. ... dont' hit me again!

I copied the image to my desktop. I posted it to my blog. I pasted the url for my version into image search, selecting find similar. It took me to his web page. Satisfied?

Wry Wryter said...

I’m sorry but all of you are incorrect, no matter how convincing you sound or the research you’ve done.

They are batons.

I was a drum major in school, and have coached twirling for years...these are decorative batons used in marches befitting different ceremonies. Some of my twirlers used exactly the same kind of batons you see pictured. Some held jute, 10th from right and fourth from left, which would be set aflame. The third from right actually won an award for using natural materials...the competition was held in Joplin Missouri about ten years ago. The eighth from left is covered in a gold/plate wash which made it extremely heavy to twirl.

I’m finding the posted suggestions very interesting as well as the convincing nature of some discriptions.

Ah hem...Janet I have a query I'd like you to read. It' about a bridge in Arizona and some swampland in Florida.

hillary said...

I think they'd all prove excellent for serving honey, especially if one was all out of clean teaspoons.

hillary said...

PS: If your teacup was the size of an armchair! (Just checked the link posted above.)

Elissa M said...

Wry Writer,

LOL!

Yup, I was in marching band, too.

Escape Artist Linda said...

Cricket bats gone wild!

J.M. Bray said...

They are War clubs. Most likely Polynesian. I figured it out by opening my email this morning, seeing the picture, and wondering. "Hmm I wonder why Janet has a group of Polynesian War clubs pictured?"

Of course....now that I make the claim, I'll be completely wrong! :-)

Bas Melech said...

I think they're different styles of banisters.

pjcasselman said...

In order to ascertain the precise identification of said artifacts, I applied the scientific principle of acute observation and looked at Laura's answer.

Nick Sanford said...

Wands! They are Harry Potter-esque wands! They're beefy and borderline chunky wands . . . but they are wands. Yep.

Cynthia Ivers said...

Knitting needles for myopic dwarves.

Nancy said...

Spurtles. Learned about these at a Scottish Highland Games. Bought a pretty, shapely wood one. For mixing food.