Tuesday, October 27, 2009

another gem from The Rejectionist

this made me laugh...or was it cry?

14 comments:

Lady Glamis said...

Wow, that's incredible! Just goes to show rejection is everywhere and nobody's immune. :)

Laurel said...

Yeah, yeah. Y'all are just trying to save your street cred after being sweet yesterday.

Dana King said...

The rejection is one thing. Was that the best typewriter they could find?

Marsha Sigman said...

I suspect you two are related.

Stephanie said...

Just goes to show that everyone has gone through this rejection process!!! My dream is to one day...maybe 5, 10, 15 years from now have people laugh at the rejection letters I've gotten!!

Malanie Wolfe said...

Wow! Even the best experience rejection. I love to hear of stories like this, keeps me motivated on those days I've recieved a few, "Sorry I cannot represent your work" letters.

Sharla said...

Poor Andy. I feel his pain. :))

Suzan Harden said...

Thanks, Janet. I needed the pick-me-up this afternoon.

Les Edgerton said...

Who's Andy Warhol? What did he write? Are there Cliff's Notes?

smalltowncinderella said...

I want to become an assistant to a literary agent... how does one do so?

Steve Stubbs said...

Was that the same committee that told Picasso to take a hike?

Aimless Writer said...

After all the years of trying to sell stuff I never thought to just give it away.
Now I have to go look up the Shoe.

Sharon Mayhew said...

Hey, it wasn't a form letter. I'm sure Andy felt good about that??? I always am.

kitty said...

Talk about rejections...
No Thanks, Mr. Nabokov:
In the summer of 1950, Alfred A. Knopf Inc. turned down the English-language rights to a Dutch manuscript after receiving a particularly harsh reader’s report. The work was “very dull,” the reader insisted, “a dreary record of typical family bickering, petty annoyances and adolescent emotions.” Sales would be small because the main characters were neither familiar to Americans nor especially appealing. “Even if the work had come to light five years ago, when the subject was timely,” the reader wrote, “I don’t see that there would have been a chance for it.”
Knopf wasn’t alone. “The Diary of a Young Girl,” by Anne Frank, would be rejected by 15 others before Doubleday published it in 1952. More than 30 million copies are currently in print, making it one of the best-selling books in history.


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