Thursday, August 20, 2015

Vacation Day #1: My vacation reading!



These arrived on Monday and it was all I could do not to dive in that very second.

Yes, these books are old friends, but I'm re-reading in preparation for MAKE ME which is coming in September.


What are you reading, or re-reading, this last week of August?

87 comments:

Brian Schwarz said...

In getting on the rothfuss train and reading the name of the wind! Yipee!

Marc P said...

I am re-reading for the umpteenth time 'COOT CLUB' by Arthur Ransome of Swallows and Amazons fame :)

Rakie said...

belatedly discovered that The Neverending Story was based on a novel, so if anyone is looking for me, i'm in my reading-nest being twelve years old again.

Angie Brooksby-Arcangioli said...

Happy vacation!

I love Lee Child, they read too fast.

I'm listening to the audiobook Clash of Kings, reading The Catcher in the Rye and Diane's The Axe and The Vase.

Kitty said...

HOWARD'S END IS ON THE LANDING, by Susan Hill, finally grabbed my attention from its dusty place in my to-read stacks. It was shouting PICK ME! PICK ME! So I did (because I needed a filler-read while waiting for Martha & Ken Grimes' dual memoir, Double Double: A DUAL MEMOIR OF ALCOHOLISM). I haven't read at least half of the authors Hill mentions, but that hasn't affected my enjoyment at all. She tucks little gems in her book, like this:

Things that Fall out of Books
Bills, paid or unpaid. Receipts. Picture postcards. Here is a copy of Graham Greene's
The Third Man out of which falls a postcard from Dirk Bogarde:

'Dear Susan, I have just spent a happy afternoon at Penguin Books with my editor, drinking peppermint tea and trying to think of alternative words for "penis".'

W.R. Gingell said...

Rakie- The Neverending Story is the best! So much better than the movie/s (and I loved the movie/s).

I'll be reading some Georgette Heyer, some Joan Aiken and will probably try to finish up Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrel :)

I have some lovely fun reading ahead of me!

Plus I want to write a full 10 000 words this week, and I'm about 6K shy ATM :D that's just as fun as reading, but not as relaxing.

Oh, and then there's the two 9 hr work days I still have to get through before blissful freedom!

Donnaeve said...

Those Lee Child books are beautiful. I love bright colors against a black background.

I just finished COMING OF AGE IN MISSISSIPPI by Ann Moody. I've now turned to THE INVENTION OF WINGS by Sue Monk Kidd. After that, it's a toss up between GO SET A WATCHMAN, and the two Laird Hunt books I'm dying to read - NEVERHOME (woman who disguises herself as a soldier in the Civil War) and KIND ONE (on a remote Kentucky pig farm, a young woman befriends two slaves and is caught between loyalties - to her husband and them.)

french sojourn said...

I am working on a couple, one is "The Sisters Brothers" and the other is "The four agreements"...although an odd pairing, they do balance each other.

cheers Hank

enjoy you vacation

Jennifer R. Donohue said...

I just finished Neil Gaiman's Lady Justice. I'm in the middle of Pale Fire and toward the end of the re-released Murakami Wind/Pinball. In the hopper I've got a book on the Irish mob in Boston (I think it's called Black Mass and I'm sure something else will roll along and grab my attention as well.

Amanda Capper said...

Going through my Harry Bosch series for the upteenth time, while awaiting my Kristan Higgins order.

E.M. Goldsmith said...

Re-reading Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy. Finishing Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (may Terry Pratchett rest in peace- I will miss him forever), and working my way through Lynn Olson's Citizens of London. Last week I reread Mercedes Lackey's Elvenbane trilogy. I am also reading Sanctum by Madeline Rose (2nd in her Asylum series). I wish I was on vacation. I love having more time for reading.

Beth said...

I'm currently finishing Shady Characters by Keith Houston. It's a historical exploration of various punctuation marks. I think I'll wrap that up tonight, but I haven't decided what's coming next yet.

Audrey Shaffer said...

Working through Linda Castillo's Burkholder series, and Donna Andrews' Meg Landslow series.
Also recently read "The Future of Us" by Jay Asher. What a great book!

Matt Adams said...

I just finished DIETLAND and LOVE ME BACK yesterday, and I'm reading parts of THE HOTEL NEW HAMPSHIRE for the 200th time. Then I'm reading ROGUE WAVE to my daughter, STORY OF THE WORLD PART 3 to one son and THE GOBLET OF FIRE to the other one while we wait for the last installment of the HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON series to ship (Brits get in in two weeks; we have to wait until early November).

What I'm not reading is anything by me, because the highly paid editor has had my book for two weeks and I'm waiting for her to crush my spirit.

Lisa Bodenheim said...

I just finished "The Rosie Project" by Graeme Simsion. A fun read with a Big Bang-ish type narrator. Next up is a debut book, "A Small Indiscretion" by Jan Ellis. (was that recommended here? I can't remember but I'm thoroughly enjoying the variety of reading from various people's recommendations). Then I'm looking forward to tackling a more serious read, "Citizen: An American Lyric" by Claudia Rankine.

W.R. Gingell-I've collected Heyer's books from various 2nd hand stores. Loved her stories since I was a teen.

Donna: I read "The Invention of Wings" just this past winter. I appreciated her story.

And--Off-Topic--I closed on a house yesterday. Whew! Now to clean and paint and take up carpet and move in furniture. THEN get that all important writing corner set up.

MB Owen said...

I just finished w/the brilliant Tana French's THE LIKENESS; currently reading Gregory Maguire's EGG + SPOON (weird title, brilliant writing); and after that, it's THE DARKEST MINDS by Bracken.


Marc P -- thought I was the only one who's read/enjoyed Swallows and Amazons.

Dena Pawling said...


In the car I'm re-reading the Stephanie Plum series on audiobook. I'm at Fearless Fourteen right now. Outside the car I'm almost finished with Shark Skin Suite by Tim Dorsey.

Congrats, Lisa, on your new house!

Colin Smith said...

My reading this year has been dominated by Bouchercon authors--published writers who are supposed to be making an appearance at Bouchercon in October. So I've read me some Donna Andrews, Karin Slaughter, and Mike Cooper (among others), and am currently reading Kathy Reich's debut, DEJA DEAD. I read a couple of her newer "Bones" books before, but that was a long time ago. It still intrigues me how different the Temperance Brennan of the books is to the "Bones" of the TV series. It seems the connection between the two characters starts and ends with the fact they are forensic anthropologists. If Kathy doesn't talk about that in October, I'll have to ask her.

There's no way I'll be able to read something by all the writers that will be there (have you seen THE LIST??), but hopefully I'll have read enough by the event to at least not look like a complete ignoramus, and still leave room to discover "new" writers while I'm there.

Amanda Capper said...

OFF TOPIC

Going back to yesterday's topic, and I hope Colin reads this because; it's his fault I'm off topic; and I need help with this link:

http://www.sarahcmcguire.com/blog/cheering-on-those-who-are-nano-ing

I watched this video because a vomment said I should (I think, Donnaeve?), anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed it as well, and I'm definitely doing NaNoWriMo this November and you can bet your set design I'll be asking Sarah to be my NaNoWriMo buddy.

Well done, Sarah. I'm going to check out Valiant.

Donnaeve said...

Lisa, I just started it, and I think what I'm most amazed by, so far, is the authenticity of that time she's captured. (for those who don't know early 1800's) Her use of words for what must have been day to day items back then is what accomplishes that. I wonder how long she researched!

Donnaeve said...

Amanda - yes that was me - I thought Sarah was hilarious, a natural in front of the camera.

Colin Smith said...

Amanda: Because you asked, and Sarah is one of our awesome lurkers:

http://www.sarahcmcguire.com/blog/cheering-on-those-who-are-nano-ing

Glad to be of service! :)

Madeline Mora-Summonte said...

Two of my favorites from August:

The MG/YA novel GOODBYE STRANGER by Rebecca Stead - fresh and smart, hopeful and full of heart. Just loved it!

And THE NIGHT SISTER by Jennifer McMahon. I've been a fan McMahon's for years now, and this latest of hers has a creepy, gothic edge to it. Excellent!

Madeline Mora-Summonte said...

Audrey Shaffer - I enjoy Castillo's Burkholder series, too. Her newest one, AFTER THE STORM, was great. I read Jay Asher's THIRTEEN REASONS WHY awhile back - an excellent read.

AJ Blythe said...

Lisa Bodenheim said... I just finished "The Rosie Project" by Graeme Simsion.

Lisa, Graeme is the keynote speaker at the conference I'm at (he's speaking Saturday). Looking forward to hearing him speak.

My current read is the third of the Lady Julia Gray (historical cozy) series by Denna Raybourn. I'm loving this series and saved this book to read while at conference.

LynnRodz said...

Don't know how some of you are able to read several books at the same time. I have to finish one before I start another, but that's just me.

I finished Faulkner's LIGHT IN AUGUST and I'm now reading THE GIRL WITH NO NAME by Marina Chapman. It's a true story about a 4 year-old girl from Colombia who was kidnapped and then left in the jungles where she survived for five years with a group of capuchin monkeys. Then at 10 she was found by hunters and sold to a brothel. Anyway, it's an amazing story. (I can't put it down.)

Next, I'll read Paula Hawkins THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN. (I'm looking forward to it.)

Have a wonderful holiday, Janet. I look forward to mine in September.

CynthiaMc said...

The Boleyn Inheritance by Philippa Gregory.

SiSi said...

Just finished Disclaimer by Renee Knight. Now reading The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler. Next up is . . . I'm not sure. Burnt River by Karen Salvalaggio, The End of All Things by John Scalzi, or Come to Harm by Catriona McPherson.

W.R. Gingell and Lisa--I love Georgette Heyer too! My grandmother introduced me to her years (decades) ago. She's my go-to reread when I'm having a bad day.

Laura Mary said...

I am currently triple-reading Kurt Vonnegut's 'Slaughterhouse 5', 'We All Looked Up' by Tommy Wallach, and 'The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making' by Catherynne M. Valente.

I like to feel I have all bases covered!

Colin Smith said...

Lynn: Not just you. I've tried reading more than one book at a time and it never works. It takes me just as long to get through them as if I'd read sequentially, and I end up losing track of plots, or getting so much more into one that I finish it before going back to the others, and then have to re-read to remind me what happened.

It might work for me if the books are in different media--e.g., one a paper book, the other an audio book. I haven't tried that before. I'll have to some time.

Just Jan said...

I just finished Murder at the Brightwell by Ashley Weaver and loved it. Next up, The Postmistress by Sarah Blake and Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese.

Maggie Maxwell said...

With the last of Terry Pratchett's Discworld books coming out at the beginning of September, I got the nutty idea in my head to reread all 40 current books before I read the last one. I'm currently 15 books in after three weeks. So that's my reading for the last week of August. And most of September.

Dena Pawling said...


Lynn & Colin -

I read an audiobook in the car by one author, and a physical or kindle book outside the car by another author. I tried reading an audio and a physical by the same author at the same time, and that did NOT work. But different media and different authors works fine for me.

Laura Mary said...

With regards to multiple books - It's not a frequent habit, and says more about my state of mind than the books I'm reading! Currently feeling flighty and restless.
I am also pending my weekends boxing up books ready to move house, and who can put a book in a box without flicking through it a little...
when I'm feeling more focused, I usually have a little queue of books lined up on my bedside table.

Do you dive from one book straight to another, or do you like to mull a story over for a day or two?

I tend to move straight on - again, nothing to do with not enjoying a book, I just feel a little bereft if I'm not in the middle of one!

Laura Mary said...

With regards to multiple books - It's not a frequent habit, and says more about my state of mind than the books I'm reading! Currently feeling flighty and restless.
I am also pending my weekends boxing up books ready to move house, and who can put a book in a box without flicking through it a little...
when I'm feeling more focused, I usually have a little queue of books lined up on my bedside table.

Do you dive from one book straight to another, or do you like to mull a story over for a day or two?

I tend to move straight on - again, nothing to do with not enjoying a book, I just feel a little bereft if I'm not in the middle of one!

Angie Brooksby-Arcangioli said...

Lynn, I finished Girl On The Train in June. It is one my all time favorites. I love book hopping during the day but any Jack Reacher novel I have to devour.

CynthiaMc said...

OT but writing related. I ordered highlighters for the office. The usual message I get from the supplier is "Your order has been received and your items are being prepared to ship." This time the message said "Your products are available and are being prepared for fulfillment." I don't want them fulfilled. I want virgin, untouched items that don't care if they're fulfilled or not. I felt as though I was part of an office supply trafficking ring...which I am, but still...

Karen McCoy said...

Splitting my time between THE ELITE by Kiera Cass, WITHER by Lauren DeStefano, and MY SUPER SWEET SIXTEENTH CENTURY by Rachel Harris...

Laura Mary said...

One thing I miss having the luxury to do these days, is hiding away from the world with a huge book and not resurfacing until it's done! Where it's a real annoyance to have to take a break for showering/eating and you convince yourself a packet of biscuits will do for dinner because making actual food is impossible with a book in hand.
I haven't done it since the last Harry Potter *Sigh* Those were the days!

Steve Forti said...

Just finished "Armada" by Ernest Cline (mindless fun is good sometimes). Currently reading "World Gone By" by Dennis Lehane. "Shift" by Hugh Howey is next up. Welcoming any suggestions to jump ahead of the long queue beyond that!

LynnRodz said...

Colin, glad I'm not alone.

Dena, thanks for the tip.

Angie, I've only heard good things about GOTT, that's why I can't wait to get to it. Thanks.

Colin Smith said...

Laura (Mary--do you prefer to be addressed by both names?): There are SO many books I haven't read, a number of which I own, that I move pretty swiftly from one book to the next. There's rarely a time when I don't have a book I'm currently reading.

Cynthia: Your products will achieve their fulfillment when they are in your possession and being utilized for whatever purpose you purchased them. Doesn't that make you feel good? :)

Marc P said...

@MB Owen - 'Swallows & Amazons forever!' :)

Laura Mary said...

Colin - Just Laura is fine - I took facebook's order to ENTER YOUR FULL NAME very literally back in the day, and it's kinda stuck in the land of the internets ever since!

CynthiaMc said...

Colin: It makes me feel like a madam.

I read multiple books too. I have 5 on my shelf by the couch and at least 1 audio on my phone for commute and 1 ebook in case I get stuck waiting somewhere.

Colin Smith said...

Cynthia: I guess that depends on what you ordered... :)

Mmm... this conversation is going somewhere it probably shouldn't.

Adele said...

I love the old Perry Mason TV show, and I'm named after his secretary, so it's odd that I had never read any of the Perry Mason novels until this summer. Now I've read a half-dozen or so, and I'm just starting "The Case of the Velvet Claws", written in 1933. Almost a historical.

I've been told that agents, editors and such-like beings hate it when writers read old books because they're afraid you'll start writing the way they did 80 years ago. I don't think so. Some of the sentence construction and phraseology is laughable, but I'm enjoying the retro feel (Della the secretary can drive a car really well! She's so modern!)

Lilly Faye said...

I finished The Sugar Queen by Sarah Addison Allen last night. I love her use of magical realism. Now I'm off to the store to find her first book, Garden Spells.

Julie.M.Weathers said...

First off, Janet, I hope you have a great time.

Because I missed saying so when Julia announced the medical news, I'm sorry. I will continue to offer up prayers for your recovery.

Thanks to Amanda and Colin for the link to Sarah's video. I looked, but couldn't find it.

As usual, I have more than one book going.

THE TRUE GEN--AN INTIMATE PORTRAIT OF HEMINGWAY BY THOSE WHO KNEW HIM by Denis Brian It's been very interesting so far and I'm about a third in.

I just finished SARAH MORGAN--A CONFEDERATE WOMAN'S DIARY. It was very good for a lot of first person information about the Civil War in Baton Rouge and New Orleans under the occupation. It's a tremendous resource for personal details of day-to-day life of women, speech patterns, customs, even if Sarah is a little insufferable.

MOSBY'S MEMOIRS BY Colonel John S. Mosby. Oh my gosh. This has been wonderful. I have so many tabs sticking out it looks like a porcupine.It's highlighted so heavily I might as well face the fact this book is useless to anyone but me. I have about a dozen other books about Mosby and J.E.B. Stuart, his CO, plus the ones on the waiting list, so it will be interesting to crosscheck all the stories. As soon as I finish this, probably today, I'll start one of the other Mosby or Stuart books.

One of the protagonists in THE RAIN CROW, my current work, rides with Stuart and then Mosby, so I was glad to find such good material about day-to-day life as well as battles.

THE KILLER ANGELS by Michael Shaara. So far it's pretty good and I like that it was so carefully researched.

WRITING 21ST CENTURY FICTION by Don Maass. The beginning kind of lagged, but it looks like it's going to be an interesting experiment. I enjoy Maass classes and writing books. I started it last night and stayed up until 3:00 a.m. reading it and listening to THE LAST SHIP, which I had never seen before.

THE CIVIL WAR DAY BY DAY by E.B. Long. I was just going to use this to cross check dates and events. Yeah, that worked well. I started reading to get my bearings about when THE RAIN CROW starts and kept reading. It's like when the boys used to ask me something and I would tell them to look it up in the encyclopedia. They'd wind up reading for hours.

MISTBORN by Brandon Sanderson. I set it aside and want to finish it this month.

On top of that, a collection of articles about the Greenough sisters who were champion lady bronc riders. The bronc riding book starts out with them.

I'm sorry for the length of this post.

I've also been starting out my day with this video to remind myself this is what happens when you practice doing something right long enough and love what you're doing. A horse doesn't do this well without loving it.

https://www.facebook.com/andreaotley1/videos/471905119647170/?pnref=story

InkStainedWench said...

I'm in Book 3 of Shelby Foote's The Civil War. I started it 150 years after the onset, but I got bogged down in the Wilderness and haven't found my way out yet.

Also: Connelly's The Burning Room
Murder on the Eiffel Tower, by Claude Izner
Burned, by Valerie Plame and Sarah Lovett

Julie.M.Weathers said...

Adele,

"I've been told that agents, editors and such-like beings hate it when writers read old books because they're afraid you'll start writing the way they did 80 years ago."

Shaara said most of the dialogue in KILLER ANGELS is taken verbatim from letters, memoirs, journals, etc. except he lightened it up to sound more modern.

The more letters, journals, diaries, and memoirs I read, the deeper I sink into the Civil War characters. The "voice" is different, more lyrical, than the fantasy, but it fits. It's as if I'm channeling the character. That style may be off-putting to some. We'll see.

Re. the reading several books at one time, it depends on what I'm in the mood for. THE ARCHER'S TALE by Bernard Cornwell is my purse book. I read it when I'm waiting somewhere only.

The Rothfuss books I pretty much had to read straight through and I cursed him for it. MOSBY'S MEMOIRS is another one I am inhaling.

Sarah said...

Ohmyword, @Donnaeave, @Amanda, and @Colin! You all are so kind- and you make it very hard to lurk! I'm glad you liked the video. A friend and author, Joy Hensley, had put together a packet for schools participating in NaNo, and that video was my contribution to it. I'd never done anything like it before, but it was fun. I was just trying to keep from boring myself as I did it. :)

And I'm currently reading an ARC of ILLUMINAE by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff that I picked up at ALA.

Colin Smith said...

Julie's video:

https://www.facebook.com/andreaotley1/videos/471905119647170/?pnref=story

Theresa said...

I know it's near blasphemy around here, but I've never read anything by Lee Child. Maybe I'm headed for Carkoon.

I recently finished Balm by Dolen Perkins-Valdez, a lovely work of historical fiction that takes place in 1860s Chicago.

I have just returned to the land of Patrick Rothfuss (I haven't read any of his books, either, but he's very well known around town), and am getting settled in after a summer lakeside. A trip to the library is imminent.

Julie.M.Weathers said...

InkStainedWench,

I adore Foote. I finished SHILOH by Foote this morning. It was very good, but I'm a Foote fanatic.

"The sky had cleared,the clouds raveled to tatters..." How can I resist images like that?

Adib Khorram said...

YEA VACATION!

Today I expect to finish Carrie Mesrobian's PERFECTLY GOOD WHITE BOY, and I am halfway through HOW NOT TO BE WRONG: THE POWER OF MATHEMATICAL THINKING.

I don't normally read two books at a time, but the library wouldn't let me renew HOW NOT TO BE WRONG—and then, when I placed a hold on it to get it back, it came up the very next day.

Oh well.

Once I finish those two, I have Alex London's PROXY and then CREATIVITY, INC. by Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace.

And then like ten more books piled on my dresser, but oh well.

I can't wait to get my hands on Ernest Cline's ARMADA. I loved READY PLAYER ONE.

Mark Ellis said...

Saul Bellow's Herzog, for the first time, in which last night I found the phrase: "the strategic buoyancy of the heartbroken."

Donnaeve said...

Sarah, I wish I could look/act/speak so natural in front of a camera - of any kind - and you were even comedic to boot. Instead, I simply look uptight. For instance, via Skype, my face looks warped, like I'm staring at myself in a doorknob. So, with that awkward awareness, I try to compensate by relaxing, but every uncomfortable little nuance which of ME looking at ME is apparent.

Oh. Well.

Donnaeve said...

Argh, correction: "which is Me looking at ME..." (me looking at me cause I just got Skype - case anyone's scratching their head)

Julie, the horse certainly loves it. The cows look like they're in hell.

Julie.M.Weathers said...

Donna,

"Julie, the horse certainly loves it. The cows look like they're in hell."

If being separated from their friends for less than 30 seconds is the worst hell they go through they'll have a good life.

Donnaeve said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Carolynnwith2Ns said...

Julie W,
"I've also been starting out my day with this video to remind myself this is what happens when you practice doing something right long enough and love what you're doing."
If ever there was a day I needed this, this was the day. At first I thought, gosh, the rider is doing this bareback, wow what a rider and then I started to watch the horse. It's the horse...it's the gosh-darn horse.
Problem is when you've spent a considerable part of your life doing something, and you end up doing it superbly, what do you do when it's taken away from you? Sorry, the OT all about me just sort of slipped out.

BTW, when do you guys have time to read? I'm writing. Well not at this very moment, so see ya.

Donnaeve said...

Julie, agreed, and the cows in hell comment was only in jest.

Marc P said...

How about that Tom Cruise?

A Velez said...

I'm using these comments to pad my TBR list - love the suggestions.

I'm trying very hard to finish THE GOLDFINCH (40 more pages!). I think Donna Tartt is brilliant, but Lord, this book is taking me forever. I feel like it could be considerably shorter. I also just started CHILD 44. I think something lighter is in order for my next read.

Kate Larkindale said...

I always have 2 books going at once. One paper one I can read in the bath without fear of electrocution, and one e-book for the bus trip to and from work. At the moment I am reading Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe in the bath. It's quietly wonderful. I just finished my last e-book, a memoir called Holding the Man. It wasn't very well written, but what an emotional read! I will have to decide what's up next when I get to the bus stop this morning.

Donnaeve said...

I just thought of this.

Future reading: I've heard a lot of good things about BAREFOOT TO AVALON: A Brother's Story, by David Payne. Since he was born in NC...it's a must read... for me anyway.

If only I didn't already have that unruly stack of 75+. I can't seem to stop myself from buying books. But, that's a good thing, right? Right.

stacy said...

Stephen King's FINDERS KEEPERS
Craig Johnson's AS THE CROW FLIES
ROGUES, edited by George RR Martin and Gardner Dozois
Susannah Cahalan's BRAIN ON FIRE
Eric Berne's GAMES PEOPLE PLAY
Patrick Lee's RUNNER

Lots of library books over which I have no control when I get, so I usually have a lot of books going on at once.

John Frain said...

Steve,

Just finished Dennis Lehane's World Gone By a few weeks ago. His Shutter Island is one of my all-time faves. Also loved Gone, Baby, Gone and Mystic River. He set the bar too high, and his last couple haven't been able to reach it for me.

Timothy Lowe said...

Cemetery Girl - thanks Janet! A gripping concept so far!

Also, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America, by Russell Shorto.

Highly recommend the latter. Hilariously dry voice, sharp writing, and impeccable research. Riveting stuff even for those who are conversant with the history.

Julie.M.Weathers said...

Carolynn,

"Problem is when you've spent a considerable part of your life doing something, and you end up doing it superbly, what do you do when it's taken away from you?"

You find something else to love doing. I no longer have any horses and no longer live in the country, but I survived. I focus on other things now.

The horse is remarkable, but so is the rider. Not many people can ride a cutting horse, let alone ride one bareback.

Regarding the reading, I make it part of my schedule. I stopped reading for a while and it affected my writing. I didn't realize it, but it did. Hemingway had the right of it. Reading recharges the creative batteries of a writer.

"When I was writing, it was necessary for me to read after I had written. If you kept thinking about it, you would lose the thing that you were writing before you could go on with it the next day." Ernest Hemingway

CynthiaMc said...

Donnaeve - I hear you on the 75+ books. My entire bookshelf by the front door (3 cubbies across and 3 rows high) consists of books to be read. I told myself I would stay within those bounds. Every book I read either goes to the veterans or in the library/music room to live with the other keepers. Thank goodness for Overdrive or I'd have to build another room.

CynthiaMc said...

Trying to be mindful of posting but had to shout out to my Civil War peeps (or as my great-aunts called it "The Recent Unpleasantness.") I grew up playing at Fort Morgan and seeing Battle of Blakely re-enactments. It was pretty common to unearth minie balls while we were playing.Our first military assignment was Petersburg, Virginia. That crater was chilling. Love Michael Shaara. Haven't tried Shelby Foote yet but I will.

Donnaeve said...

CynthiaMac - I think I'm going to take my books (those 75+) and stack them, take a picture and blog about it. Because honestly. It's REEDonkulous. As my son says.

My husband and I are both into Civil War - well for him he studies any war really. We live close to Averasboro and Bentonville. We've been to several re-enactments at both sites. On a hot summer day they are sort of spooky when no one else is around.

While I'm taking those pictures of the books, I should also scan one from Mississippi when we went to the Pilgrimage they have every Spring. They throw open the doors on all the historic homes, and folks dress up in period dress. In it, I'm standing amongst a bunch ladies dressed as Civil War widows and men in uniform. I love it.

Carolynnwith2Ns said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Carolynnwith2Ns said...

Julie W. as usual you are right.
I'm going to go read now. My pile of unread, half finished and I just can't get into it books is obscene. I think I'll find an untouched gem to Energize my writing-bunnies.

Ah, the previous deleted comment was mine because of a dumb typo.

Theresa said...

Donna: I liked Neverhome, but so far Paulette Jiles's Enemy Women is my favorite Civil War historical novel.

Curtis Moser said...

Just finished SPEAKS THE NIGHTBIRD by Robert McCammon and am now knee-deep into THE QUEEN OF BEDLAM, also by McCammon. I'm rediscovering him after a decade-long hiatus. He's a great storyteller.

CynthiaMc said...

The Wolf's Hour is my favorite McCammon.

Donnaeve said...

Theresa, thanks - now the TBR will have to go to 76...

almostwritten said...

I am reading Moscow-Petushki by Venedikt Erofeev. The author described as "the ultimate drinking novel" and so far this has proven to be a very accurate summary. The first line reads: I have never seen the Kremlin [despite having doddered around Moscow about a hundred times] and it just gets more dysfunctional from there. Also, it contains some very interesting recipes. I have an inkling Your Sharkly Highness would appreciate this book.

Have a lovely holiday!

Jerrianne Hayslett said...

"We Sinners" by Hanna Pylvainen
"The Magical Ms. Plum" by Bonny Becker
"Life is a Terminal Illness" by Cynthia McDonald (self-published on Kindle by my niece who was diagnosed with and had surgery two years ago for a brain tumor)

racherin said...

I just finished Uprooted, by Naomi Novik, and I plan to immediately read it again and analyze it because it is the sort of book I want to be a comp for me (not that I'm remotely there, yet).

I read it in less than 24 hours, even with family visiting, and normal lots-of-young-kids chores.

It's beautifully plotted, with amazing characters, a heart-wrenching villain, and one of the few fresh heroines I've encountered in awhile. I now need to read everything else she's written.

It's also a good read for people thinking about the YA/adult convo from the comments a few days ago - it is fantasy, with a 17 year old protagonist, and it is _not_ YA. The comments helped me pick apart why it wasn't, and what would have been different in it.

Waverly said...

Thanks for all the great suggestions. More things to add to my library list.

I'm rereading The Emperor of Scent about biochemist and scent genius, Luca Turin, because I'm working on an essay about trying to capture the scent of a flower. Chandler Burr can make chemistry sound fascinating. And I'm reading it with Perfumes: The Guide by Luca Turn by my side so I can look up his fabulous descriptions of perfumes whenever one is mentioned in the text.

Pepper Smith said...

Actually not reading anything right now, because I'm finishing up writing a novel. But oh! The choices for afterward...Charles Todd, Carola Dunn, Josephine Tey, Ngaio Marsh, among others. Where to start, where to start...

D. B. Bates said...

I finally got around to starting The Long Embrace by Judith Freeman. I was given to believe this would be a somewhat history-based nonfiction account of Raymond Chandler's relationship with his wife. When the first chapter was almost entirely about Freeman and her obsession with Chandler, I thought, "Okay, she's explaining why she wrote this book. That's fine." But the book...kept being more about her than Chandler. I've never read any of Freeman's novels, and I don't care about her as a person or a Chandlerphile. I felt hoodwinked.

I gave up and moved on to Empire Express by David Haward Bain, about the building of the transcontinental railroad. It has been suggested that summer is for lighter, breezier books.

annie said...

I was beaten up in the workplace in 2011--forced to retire a couple years early. For the first two years of my recovery, all I did was read Jack Reacher novels. Nothing else. When I'd read them all, I read them all again. There's a lot more to this story; suffice to say, Childs and a ridiculous border collie named Sophie kept me going. True story.