Saturday, November 03, 2012

Here's to that guy, you know the one

The one who got out of bed and somehow managed to get to the rallying point, snag a snazzy fluorescent vest and a light baton, and got to work directing traffic at the intersections with no working lights. That guy.   Biking and walking across the blocks affected by the power outage was a whole lot scarier than I'd ever imagined it would be.  It only takes that one car who doesn't see you!

Thanks guys in traffic posts!


The one who got out of bed and somehow managed to get to work, tied on her uniform apron and started in on the breakfast and lunch shift

Being able to get hot food, and hot coffee was a re-appreciated little luxury.

Thanks guys in the bodegas and eateries!


And the train information guys at 34th Street Herald Square who directed a gazillion people to the correct side of the tracks, answered the same question two gazillion times, and did it standing on hard subway platforms  most of the time.  I have no idea how these guys got to work, but it was great to have them there.

Thanks MTA front line customer service guys!



We often think of infrastructure as roads and pipes and transportation but this hurricane showed me that our true infrastructure, what really keeps us going are the working folks of New York.

Thanks guys! In the words of the great Graham Nash "everything is easier cause of you."

17 comments:

Mark Koopmans said...

Hey,

You should make this one of your 100-word contests... here's my entry in one:

Amen.

Michael Seese said...

I always think it's one thing to feel gratitude, but another (more important thing) to openly express it.

Anna Delaunay said...

There are a lot of good folks out there in our communities, working hard (and sometimes thankless) jobs. We are lucky to have them. Thanks for this reminder, Janet!

www.thestripednickel.blogspot.com

Jane | @janelebak said...

A big thank-you to the cops who are working twelve-hour-on, twelve-hour-off shifts.

Lynn(e) Schmidt said...

This is awesome. I'm not there with you guys, my power came back the next day, but my thoughts are with you. Keep your head up! You New Yorkers are tough!

Ali Trotta said...

this was lovely.

Steve Masover said...

+1 !!

skipperhammond said...

YES YES. It's the working class of people that produce everything we need but rarely get the credit--and little cash. Thanks for the appreciation.

BP said...

So sweet, so true! Thanks for the reminder and recognition of such truly deserving people!

Wry Wryter said...

Here's to the guy, hey, you know the one, the one who thanked all the guys for stepping forward when the rest of us were stumbling all over the place.
Thanks Janet for reminding us to say thanks.

When I drove down our country road in Connecticut and saw the tree cutting trucks and the power trucks I slowed down and as I drove by I thanked the guys. They were all the way from Missouri.

Thanks guys.

Nancy Thompson said...

Nice tribute! Well deserved.

Sha'el, Princess of Pixies said...

Bill E. Goat and I were really worried about you and all our friends in NYC

ferris robinson said...

Yes! This needs to be printed and stapled to every telephone pole, and shared and viral! GREAT POST!!

Chelsea Schmitt said...

Yes, they deserve all the awards, disaster or no, I don't think we say it often enough.

Thanks!

Amy L. Sonnichsen said...

It's so easy to take the little things for granted. Lovely post!

Terri Lynn Coop said...

Wonderful post and I hope things are well for you and your office.

I'm in an itty bitty town in the midwest and we recently had an outage related to 70 mph shear winds (sort of a straight-line tornado.) The power trucks were swarming as soon as the last leaf stopped twitching.

It took three long hot days to get it done. I gave a thumbs-up or applause to every utility truck I saw. Those guys are unsung heroes.

christwriter said...

One thing that awed me about the company I used to work for was how, no matter what they were doing, when disaster hit they WERE the freaking front lines. Not as important as the paramedics and the police, but they helped people get "normal" back in record time.